Inside Travel Writing: An interview with Geoff Moore

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Geoff Moore is a photographer and travel blogger based in Dorset, England. He operates The Travel Trunk blog and his photographs have been published in many of the United Kingdom’s national newspapers.

Disclosure: Some of the links below — marked with (£) — are affiliate links, meaning, at no additional cost to you, I will earn a commission if you click through and make a purchase.

From his base in Weymouth, Geoff, who is a member of the National Union of Journalists, reveals aspects of his life producing travel-related content for publications.

What kind of travel related niche do you specialise in?

It was the area of travel photography that hooked me first the writing and blogging came much later. I started on a fashion shoot in Kenya and then quickly switched from East Africa to West Africa where I worked for around eight years for a specialist holiday company.  Seeing the first brochure come out with so many of my images in it was a real buzz.

I love all aspects of the travel industry.

I tend to cover many different areas. I know I should be more niche but I enjoy the boats, the trains and the planes that take you to wonderful places, as well as the destinations and resorts.

I now blog, write, photograph and video so there is not a niche there either. Unless doing all four is niche?

Which piece of work are you most proud of and why?

All of them! Whether it’s for my own blog or for other websites, magazines and newspapers. I guess ‘holistic’ sums it up.

On my website I have news stories about travel. I was doing a rolling news blog about the chaos caused by drones at Gatwick Airport as Christmas 2018 approached. I also write about aspects of heritage and travel, as you can read in my story on the Malaysian colonial heritage trail.

Is there perhaps one project you can highlight because of the challenges it posed or the feeling of elation you experienced upon publication?

What do you enjoy most about travel photography?

The whole experience; the people, the places, the discovering.

The profession has changed significantly. I started working as a photographer during the days of film. Many people reading this will probably have no idea of the logistics needed when shooting in an African country. You could be travelling for up to two weeks with 80 to 100 rolls of 120 film, shooting on a Mamiya 645 camera.

Firstly getting them all there and back safely, storing and keeping them fresh on the road getting them through airport X-rays. With security sometimes insisting that their scanners are film safe and hoping against all hopes that they were correct. Add in language barriers you have all the ingredients of a disaster waiting to happen. As re-shooting would cost dearly in time and money. Seeing the processed slides at the lab was always a huge relief!

Backing up images on my laptop and also onto separate hard-drive is now at least in my control and not at the whim of hopefully a possibly disgruntled airport official.

Geoff Moore enjoying the scenery at Inle Lake in Myanmar.
Geoff Moore enjoying the scenery at Inle Lake in Myanmar.

Do you have a favourite destination?

It’s hard to have just one favourite. It’s probably Fregate Island in the Seychelles.

I first visited Fregate Island when it was a very basic destination with small hotels and guest houses, and the island was very natural.

I visited a few years ago and it was then one of the most select private destinations in the world. You get your own butler, solar powered golf cart and a choice of 20 different pillows just for starters. I had three wonderful days there.

It has unique wildlife as well as seven beaches to choose from.

Geoff Moore photographing a Buddhist temple in Yangon, Myanmar.
Geoff Moore photographing a Buddhist temple in Yangon, Myanmar.

What would be a typical working day for you, if there is such a thing?

There is no such thing as a typical day. If I’m travelling then those are certainly different.

Back at base in Dorset, days are never the same either (£):

Do you ever suffer from creative block?

When away travelling then, really, never. Back at base in Dorset a stroll down to a seaside cafe on the Jurassic Coast means inspiration always comes (£):

What tip or tips would you offer to anyone entering the industry?

I would like to say ‘don’t’! However, travel has given me so much over the years although now it does seem that the job has diminishing incomes.
You just have to persist!

Geoff Moore by a mural in Myanmar.
Blooming lovely. Geoff by a mural in Myanmar.

Which writers or photographers inspire you and why?

I have never been one to follow any other creatives. I tend to plough a furrow of my own. Be yourself! Don’t copy or worry about everyone else.

Looking for inspiration as a travel writer? Take a look at the Travel Writer’s Field Guide (£):


Want to become a travel writer? Find out more in Lonely Planet’s How to be a Travel Writer (£):

What do you aspire to achieve as a creative within the travel industry?

Making a living.

It’s a tough industry, what do you see as its biggest challenges?

Making a living! (£):

travel, holidays, accomodation, Agoda

What about its opportunities?

There are some amazing opportunities within the business. However, if you live outside of the M25 it’s often a harder task to grasp them.

In the frame. Geoff Moore with a guide in Myanmar.
No oil painting! Geoff holding a picture frame with a guide in Myanmar.

Is there a destination you are particularly keen to visit?

There are a number. The Antarctic would be right up there on my list. Many have been. It’s not impossible. Whether I would like to spend six months in the dark? No! I do not just want a passport stamp either but it does appeal (£):

If you weren’t a travel writer what would you like to be?

A travel agent, as you still get the chance of getting away on familiarisation trips.

You can see Geoff’s work on The Travel Trunk and see his videos on The Travel Trunk YouTube channel.

If you enjoyed this edition of Inside Travel Writing, why not check out interviews with the likes of Lea Lane, Olivia Greenway and Solange Hando.

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